Day 151 (of 185) quick thinking about ‘the future’ of education

Day 151 (of 185) quick thinking about ‘the future’ of education

Our yearbook team had a couple of big thinking questions for me. I could’ve gone on for many pages, but….I tried to keep it focused….!
School in 10 years
a question for you: what do you see education looking like 10 years from now? 

Education will continue to be more personalized. I think we will shift further away from letter-grades connected to how well you did on tasks, and move towards a badge/certificate/”level up” method of celebrating what learning has been mastered and setting a target for “whats next”.
Will there be more online, at home education going on? 

I think there will be more “asynchronous” learning being done. This means that there may be more learning taking advantage of online methods, including video and virtual/augmented reality. Imagine being in the middle of a historical event to see what it was like! It may also help students who can’t get into a school still be involved in the learning community (FaceTime into a classroom!)
Will schools have as many students?

I still believe schools will be full of students. A central hub for collaboration (student-student, student-teacher) will continue to be invaluable. It’s just likely that students won’t necessarily all be doing the same things at the same times. I believe the partnership between students-teachers-parents will continue as we spend more time focused on ongoing-descriptive-feedback-loops which focus on individual learning growth, and schools will be a great location for that to happen!
——

As an additional part, our staff is also exploring what our schedule might be evolving to….less bells and more breaks….influenced by the work done in Finland (60 minute periods: 45 work, 15 break) so our early draft (still to be vetted by unions, senior leaders, and our learning community) looks like:

We are intrigued – and this came up as we need to adjust our grade 8 schedule to accommodate more minutes of instruction, so we are looking at this as an opportunity to acknowledge a lot of what primary classes do that research says can benefit learners of all ages!
Thoughts? Feel free to “poke some holes” in this possible ‘schedule of the future’!

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About technolandy

Educator in BCs Sunny Shuswap Pushing 'technologization' in education: blending technology and curriculum seamlessly. Advocate for better understanding of Anxiety in Education (and use of self-regulation) Utilizing ePortfolios & Descriptive Feedback
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2 Responses to Day 151 (of 185) quick thinking about ‘the future’ of education

  1. Stacey K says:

    This year our district experimented with an alternative schedule which included, for elementary, no bells between school start and lunch. Each teacher was free to take the kids outside when it worked best for the class as a whole, rather than “wait 15 more minutes for the bell”. My kids loved it! It meant that not all classes were out at the same time, so there was more space on the playgrounds, etc. Downside was that recess was considered “instructional time”, so the teachers did not get any breaks between school start and lunch. It was grieved and now we are back to bells. Hopefully, we can continue to make progress. I do like the 45/15 work/break theory outlined above.

    • technolandy says:

      One of my favourite schools also had “no recesses” <– fortunately not grieved as it helped the students by having "breaks as needed" and allowed the staff to create time for Professional Learning Communities to get together

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