Day 21 (of 188) different perspectives

Day 21 (of 188) different perspectives

So…..today we (my wife and I) received an email update on our daughters ‘status in the class’. It had her assignments, her percentage (93) the class average (65) etc…

My wife’s reaction: wow she (the teacher) is on top of things.

My reaction: hmmm wonder if the percentages are norm referenced and what’s the margin of error (teasingly – teacher has a great reputation and my daughter already has a connection).

My wife: happy that so far our now-high-school daughter is doing well

Me: why does it matter what the class average is?

Traditional: whew, % indicates level of success

???? (too many potential terms/names): how do we shift from task-collection to communicating about learning.

Obstacle: reporting achievements is entrenched as part of the ‘educational experience’

Overcome: focusing on descriptive feedback?….because while I may be relieved my daughter has 93% based on two assignments (not sure about weighting or anything else like that….yet….) I’m not sure what specifically she did well on (neatness? complete answers? correct comprehension? etc) or what it is that she should be working on/spending more time on/needs support with… (awkward – it’s the same list as what’s in that last bracket…)

Interesting: in a quick snapshot on a simple email, there are big differences between what two parents see….I left out my daughters thoughts and comments….and I haven’t chatted with the teacher for their intention….because intention vs interpretation can be very different things when sharing information/data/symbols…. Which is why I always like discussing the differences in reporting achievement vs communicating learning.

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About technolandy

Principal of Sorrento Elementary Educator pushing 'technologization' in education: blending technology and curriculum seamlessly. Advocate for better understanding of Anxiety in Education (and use of self-regulation) Piloting ePortfolios
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