Day 154 (of 184) deadlines as influenced by @kenoc7

Day 154 (of 184) deadlines as influenced by @kenoc7

One of the common questions/concerns/complaints about a shift from a summative-focused report card system to a formative-assessment eportfolio methodology is ‘deadlines’. When are things ‘due’.

For years I’ve been sharing the work of Ken O’Connoe (@kenoc7) where ‘due dates’ should be secondary to genuine examples of learning. It’s a huge shift to move away from tasks (and having enough work samples to create a representative mark/letter grade/% to assign a ‘value’ to learning over an artificial period of time.

Educators claim learning happens at different rates for different learners, yet we like to report achievement at various times, with the one common time for all schools being “the end of the year”. And I’ll let Sir Ken talk about ‘classes based on date of manufacture’: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDZFcDGpL4U

But there are deadlines – even when archiving learning via eportfolios. But the deadlines are real, genuine, and authentic. If the Mothers Day projects (mixing many subject areas in elementary school) aren’t done … If the writing for a young authors contest doesn’t get to the judges on time … If you’re not ready and on time for a math completion, kickoff, tipoff, concert, curtain rise …. There are consequences. If a student represents their learning but takes longer than ‘the class’ it may be inconvenient, but the more important question will be … why?

Home support (or lack thereof), sudden inspiration, changing family dynamics can all have an impact on the timing to represent learning.

Be mindful of setting deadlines, is It for you, for the learner, for a ‘real’ performance deadline…? Don’t let deadlines end the learning journey.

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About technolandy

Educator in BCs Sunny Shuswap Pushing 'technologization' in education: blending technology and curriculum seamlessly. Advocate for better understanding of Anxiety in Education (and use of self-regulation) Utilizing ePortfolios & Descriptive Feedback
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